1. It seems that every time John Proctor, Giles Corey, and Francis Nurse try to defend their wives, they are accused of trying to overthrow the court. What would Rev. Parris have to lose if the defense's case was seriously considered? What would Danforth and the judges have to lose?
2. What does Abigail's refusal to answer Danforth's questions show about the status the trials have given her?
We noted before that public reputation can make or break one in Salem. How is this importance of reputation reflected in Act III?.
3. Danforth admonishes that "--a person is either with this court or he must be counted against it , there be no road between." In other words, thers is no room for honest disagreement as far as he's concerned. What are some modern day scenarios where those in authority have taken that approach? Are there instances where this type of thinking is justified? Explain you answer. Some of Salem's accused got into trouble merely because they stood up for those who had been arrested. The court obviously believed in guilt by association . What do you think about the theory of guilt by association? Can it ever be valid? Explain your answer. Explain Danforth's course of logic in refusing to pardon the remaining prisoners. What might he have to lose by doing so? What would Proctor's confession do for Danforth and Hathorne? What's in it for Proctor by refusing to confess? What does Elizabeth mean when she says that John has his goodness now, and God forbid she should take it from him? Some might say that, in John Proctor's case, honesty was definitely not the best policy. After all, he couldn't save his friends and was hanged in the end. But given what we know about John's character, how do you think his life would have gone if he had confessed?
4. Danforth admonishes that "--a person is either with this court or he must be counted against it , there be no road between." In other words, thers is no room for honest disagreement as far as he's concerned. What are some modern day scenarios where those in authority have taken that approach? Are there instances where this type of thinking is justified? Explain you answer.
5. Some of Salem's accused got into trouble merely because they stood up for those who had been arrested. The court obviously believed in guilt by association . What do you think about the theory of guilt by association? Can it ever be valid? Explain your answer.
6. Explain Danforth's course of logic in refusing to pardon the remaining prisoners. What might he have to lose by doing so?
7. What would Proctor's confession do for Danforth and Hathorne? What's in it for Proctor by refusing to confess?
8. What does Elizabeth mean when she says that John has his goodness now, and God forbid she should take it from him?
9. Some might say that, in John Proctor's case, honesty was definitely not the best policy. After all, he couldn't save his friends and was hanged in the end. But given what we know about John's character, how do you think his life would have gone if he had confessed?